Kenya > The Great Rift Valley


  • Hi Michele, just a quick email to thank you for all the help with our trip, we had a truly amazing time and everything ran like clockwork. The Boma Hotel was perfect for us; they let us check straight into the room on arrival and we even enjoyed breakfast on the terrace before hitting the sack, then a great afternoon by the pool before a lovely evening meal and a peaceful early night to prepare us for the excitement ahead. Offbeat Meru was a perfect re-introduction to Africa, and the Offbeat camp managers Craig and Ashley were amazing. The Rhino Sanctuary gave us our first ever viewing of rhinos, the whole area was lovely and quiet and as you know the camp is a tiny corner of heaven- perfect recommendation! The Offbeat corner of Mara was teaming with every size of wildlife and very few other vehicles ever ventured down into ” our” area of the conservancy. Basically the Offbeat way is exactly how we like to do Africa and I cannot think of anything negative to report. I will of course complete the questionnaire but just wanted to thank you personally for all your help. Speaking to the guides and managers they seem to agree Zimbabwe should be next on our list!

    Philip and Natalie from Lancashire travelled to Kenya
Elmentaita aerial, Great Rift Valley, KenyaFish Eagle, Lake Baringo, KenyaFlamingoes, Great Rift Valley, KenyaGreat Rift Valley relaxation, KenyaLake Baringo, Great Rift Valley, KenyaLake Naivasha boat cruise, Great Rift Valley, KenyaLake Nakuru, Great Rift Valley, KenyaLeopard in tree, Nakuru, Kenya



The Great Rift Valley

Running from north to south through the heart of Kenya, the Great Rift Valley is most famous for the alkaline and fresh water lakes which are found along its length at various intervals – Turkana in the north, followed by Baringo, Bogoria, Nakuru, Elmentaita, Naivasha to Natron on the border with Tanzania.

The alkaline lakes such as Lake Bogoria, Lake Nakuru, Lake Elmentaita and Lake Natron are rich in blue-green algae which attracts vast flocks of greater and lesser flamingos, whilst the less alkaline lakes Baringo and Turkana are home to populations of hippo and crocodile, and together with Lake Naivasha (fresh water) a wide range of water birds. The two lakes most commonly visited are Nakuru and Naivasha.

Lake Naivasha is the highest of the lakes, at 6000’ above sea level, and although surrounded by volcanic mountains, the lake is fresh water. It covers an area of around 115 sq.kms., and is one of the most picturesque in Africa. More than 300 species of birds can be seen. To the south of the lake lies the dormant volcano, Longonot (which can be climbed), and Hell’s Gate Gorge National Park, whilst to the west, numerous, infrequently visited, smaller crater lakes can be found. On the south shore of the lake is Elsamere, Joy Adamson’s former home and now a Conservation Centre. Naivasha is the centre of the Kenyan cut-flower industry.

Of all the Great Rift Valley Lakes, the 200 sq. km. Nakuru National Park is most associated with traditional big game-viewing. The lakeshore and surrounding acacia woodland is a sanctuary for wildlife, especially both black and white rhino, and the rare Rothschild giraffe. However, the park is perhaps best known for the pink sheen which covers the lake – the flamingo population. Whilst Lake Nakuru is a beautiful park with great game-viewing, its location (proximity to Nairobi and on the main route for safaris visiting both the north and Masai Mara) and small size does lay it open to being busy and over-crowded.

For further information on safaris to the Great Rift Valley and surrounding areas please call us on 01787 888590 or contact us to speak to one of our safari experts.

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