Namibia > Swakopmund & Walvis Bay

Namibia

  • Hi Rob, thank you so much for organising a fabulous holiday for us. We loved every minute of it and it far exceeded all our expectations (which were already high!). There were so many highlights and we are currently ploughing through and editing approximately 3,000 photos so are reliving all the memories. The Victoria Falls were magnificent, in full spate and Ilala Lodge was lovely. We loved the Chobe river, and the birdlife was superb. We saw about 60 elephants drinking at Elephant Bay which was memorable. The 3 safari camps were awesome. In every case the standard of accommodation was amazing, the food delicious and nothing was too much trouble. Our favourite camp was Shinde – the atmosphere and friendliness almost moved us to tears. At each camp we saw lots and a great variety of animals and birds. A highlight was a pride of nine lions at Selinda which, after an abortive warthog hunt, decided to flop down in the shade of our vehicle. They were so close I could have reached out and touched them. You have now thoroughly converted us to safaris and we have Namibia on the high wishlist.

    Pauline and Derrick from Surrey travelled to Zimbabwe, Namibia and Botswana
A Swakopmund street, NamibiaAerial view of Sandwich Harbour, NamibiaCentral Swakopmund, NamibiaPink-back pelican, Walvis Bay, NamibiaRoad in Swakopmund, NamibiaSandwich Harbour lagoon, near Walvis Bay, NamibiaSeal swimming, Pelican Point, NamibiaSoda flats, Swakopmund, Namibia

Namibia

Regions

Swakopmund and Walvis Bay

The two major coastal towns of Walvis Bay and Swakopmund are just 30 kms apart but serve as a good stopping point between a visit to the Namib Desert and Damaraland to the north. Walvis Bay serves as the main port, whilst Swakopmund developed as the ‘holiday’ destination and is far less ‘industrial’.

Most visitors stay in Swakopmund from which there are numerous excursions including those to Sandwich Harbour, and the interior ‘moon landscape’ and Welwitschia plains. From Walvis harbour, a range of wildlife cruises are also available, particularly to the Pelican Point seal colony (kayaking also possible). Between the two towns, a sand dune belt is used for quad-biking and dune boarding, whilst sky-diving is also possible for anyone seeking an adrenalin adventure!

Further up the coast, towards the Skeleton Coast National Park lies the Cape Cross seal colony, home to the largest Cape fur seal colony with some 100 000 ‘residents’.

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